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Too much added sugar comes from sugary drinks…

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STILL not convinced??!…

A heart stopping two decade study!!

A study that followed 40,000 men for two decades found that those who averaged one can of a sugary beverage per day had a 20% higher risk of having a heart attack or dying from a heart attack than men who rarely consumed sugary drinks (De Koning et al, 2012). A related study in women found a similar sugary beverage–heart disease link (Fung et al, 2009)

Drink less sugar and there'll be less obesity - who knew?!

Dr. Frank Hu, Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, recently made a strong case that there is sufficient scientific evidence that decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related diseases. (Hu, 2013).

Surely a study of 90,000 women can't be wrong?!

The Nurses’ Health Study looked at the link between sugary drinks and type 2 diabetes by following the health of more than 90,000 women for eight years. The nurses who said they had one or more servings a day of a sugary drink or fruit punch were twice as likely to have developed type 2 diabetes during the study than those who rarely had these beverages (Schulze et al, 2004).

If you want to increase your liver fat by 142% then keep drinking the sugar!

Danish researchers discovered that drinking non-diet soda leads to dramatic increases in fat build-up around the liver and the skeletal muscles, both of which can contribute to insulin resistance and diabetes. The study revealed that people who drank a regular soda every day for six months saw a 132 to 142 percent increase in liver fat, a 117 to 221 percent jump in skeletal fat, and about a 30 percent increase in both triglyceride blood fats and other organ fat. Their consumption also led to an 11 percent increase in cholesterol, compared with the people who drank other beverages such as water or milk (Maersk et al, 2012).

Drinking sugary drinks can be a catalyst to ageing!

Diet or regular, all colas contain phosphates, or phosphoric acid, a weak acid that gives colas their tangy flavor and improves their shelf life. Although it exists in many whole foods, such as meat, dairy, and nuts, too much phosphoric acid can lead to heart and kidney problems, muscle loss, and osteoporosis, and one study suggests it could trigger accelerated aging. The study, published in a 2010 issue of the FASEB Journal, found that the excessive phosphate levels found in sodas caused lab rats to die a full five weeks earlier than the rats whose diets had more normal phosphate levels—a disturbing trend considering that soda manufacturers have been increasing the levels of phosphoric acid in their products over the past few decades.

Dentists have a name for children who drink too much Mountain Dew...

Dentists have a name for the condition they see in kids who drink too much Mountain Dew. They wind up with a “Mountain Dew Mouth,” full of cavities caused by the drink’s excessive sugar levels. “Mountain Dew Mind” may be the next medical condition that gets named after the stuff. An ingredient called brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, added to prevent the flavouring from separating from the drink, is an industrial chemical used as a flame retardant in plastics. Also found in other citrus-based soft drinks and sports drinks, the chemical has been known to cause memory loss and nerve disorders when consumed in large quantities. Researchers also suspect that, like brominated flame retardants used in furniture foam, the chemical builds up in body fat, possibly causing behavioral problems, infertility, and lesions on heart muscles over time

Just one can of sugary drink a day can increase YOUR chance of heart disease!

In 2012, a study from Harvard University found that people who drink only one can of soda a day dramatically increase their risk of chronic heart disease (CHD). Compared to participants who drank the least soda, those who drank the most were 20 percent more likely to have a heart attack. “Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages was associated with increased risk of CHD and some adverse changes in lipids, inflammatory factors, and leptin,” the researchers concluded.

Want to know how 90% of the population can halt weight gain?!

Evidence suggests that maintained reductions in consumption of approximately 100 calories per day (less than a can of soda) could halt weight gain for 90% of the population (Fletcher, 2011).

References

References – campaign image statements:

Malik, V. S., & Hu, F. B. (2012). Sweeteners and risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes: the role of sugar-sweetened beverages. Current diabetes reports,12(2), 195-203

UKHF Discussion Paper ‘Options for action to support the reduction of sugar intakes in the UK’. Original references: Public Health England. 2013. National Dental Epidemiology Programme for England: oral health survey of five-year old children 2012. A report on the prevalence and severity of dental decay. Public Health England. http://www.nwph.net/dentalhealth/survey-results5.aspx?id=1)

Yang, Q., Zhang, Z., Gregg, E. W., Flanders, W. D., Merritt, R., & Hu, F. B. (2014). Added sugar intake and cardiovascular diseases mortality among US adults. JAMA internal medicine174(4), 516-524.

References – website statements:

Block, J. P., & Willett, W. C. (2013). Taxing Sugar-Sweetened Beverages: Not a “Holy Grail” but a Cup at Least Half Comment on “Food Taxes: A New Holy Grail?”. International journal of health policy and management, 1(2), 183.

Choi HK, Curhan G. Soft drinks, fructose consumption, and the risk of gout in men: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 2008;336:309-12.

Choi HK, Willett W, Curhan G. Fructose-rich beverages and risk of gout in women. JAMA. 2010;304:2270-8.

de Koning L, Malik VS, Kellogg MD, Rimm EB, Willett WC, Hu FB. Sweetened beverage consumption, incident coronary heart disease, and biomarkers of risk in men. Circulation. 2012;125:1735-41, S1.

Dhingra, R., Sullivan, L., Jacques, P. F., Wang, T. J., Fox, C. S., Meigs, J. B., & Vasan, R. S. (2007). Soft drink consumption and risk of developing cardiometabolic risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in middle-aged adults in the community. Circulation, 116(5), 480-488.

Fletcher, J. (2011). Soda Taxes and Substitution effects: will obesity be affected?. Choices, 26(3), 1-4.

Fung TT, Malik V, Rexrode KM, Manson JE, Willett WC, Hu FB. Sweetened beverage consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89:1037-42.

Hu FB. Resolved: there is sufficient scientific evidence that decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related diseases. Obes Rev. 2013;14:606-19.

Maersk, M., Belza, A., Stødkilde-Jørgensen, H., Ringgaard, S., Chabanova, E., Thomsen, H., … & Richelsen, B. (2012). Sucrose-sweetened beverages increase fat storage in the liver, muscle, and visceral fat depot: a 6-mo randomized intervention study. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 95(2), 283-289.

Malik VS, Popkin BM, Bray GA, Despres JP, Willett WC, Hu FB. Sugar-sweetened beverages and risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. Diabetes Care. 2010;33:2477-83.

Schulze MB, Manson JE, Ludwig DS, et al. Sugar-sweetened beverages, weight gain, and incidence of type 2 diabetes in young and middle-aged women. JAMA. 2004;292:927-34.